Don’t Forget The Boomtown Rats Were Rodents

The chorus to Sir Bob’s big hit “I Don’t Like Mondays” is either the same question ( “Tell me why [you did it]?”) being ignored twice ( “I don’t like Mondays.”) and answered once ( “I don’t like Mondays; I want to shoot the whole day down.”), or two different questions ( “Tell me why [you did it]?” and “Tell me why [you don’t like Mondays]?”) with varying answers. The long and the short of it is that we really don’t know.
If you’re of a certain age, any time someone mentions not liking Mondays, a certain piano melody instantly pops to mind. But that in no way means you’re guaranteed to remember what the song is actually about.

“Yeah, I hate Mondays too!” is hardly the response you want from some office clerk with a vague recollection of 80s music when discussing a mass killing. But there you go.

Likewise, “The first thing we do is kill all the lawyers” is actually a defence of lawyers. While plotting to overthrow the king, those involved know that to control the populace they must get rid of the lawyers. Most people don’t know that either. That’s because most people live in a sound bite culture, not giving a damn about the context or history of the words they use regularly.

Another example of this is the giggling that ensues from the cheap seats when someone talks about progress being “retarded” by cost overruns because the shareholders are “niggardly” with their money. One is related to the un-PC term; one isn’t. If I have to tell you which one, please stop reading now and go stick you head in a pond, lake, or other convenient water source.

Was that arrogant? Snobbish perhaps? Of course it was, but those of you who know can’t argue that I’m wrong about this. Until next time, mind your “P’s and Q’s.”

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